5 TIPS TO REEL-IN YOUR RETOUCHING BUDGET

by Ryan Moore


There are many contributing factors in a modern day retail campaign, and thus managing the details of it's various pieces can be a challenge. These 5 imagery considerations can help you meet deadlines, under budget.

       

1. BACKGROUND PLATES

During photo shoots, ensure the photographer captures each background with the subject removed. These images are commonly used as donors for background extensions or rebuilds, and often save a considerable amount of time.

 2. ADJUSTMENT CURVES 

Ask your photographer if they've applied any exposure and/or color adjustments themselves. If they have, acquire these adjustments, or simply introduce your retoucher to your photographer. This ensures that the retoucher begins development with matching exposure and color. 

3. PRODUCT & PROPS

Important objects in photos, mainly your product in it's correct color and form, should be sent to your retoucher. These items serve as a cross reference for color and detail during modifications and color development.

4. USAGE

Will this image be used for online marketing, or will it be printed large to be wrapped around a building in London? These details can change the scope of a project drastically, and will save from retouching things at an unnecessary resolution or scale.

5. MARK-UPS

How thorough do you intend the retouching to be, what are your main concerns, and what are you expecting the finished image to look like? Provide as many details as possible, and keep the retoucher informed of project changes. Quality mark-ups eliminate rounds of editing, and the deliverables are completed sooner.

     

My clients have enacted these methods to keep their retouching efforts efficient and effective. In turn, I'm provided with ample time to ensure deliverables have as much flexibility for my clients as possible, which is one of rymo's unique offerings. 

What other simple and effective tips for managing budgets and timelines have you discovered? 




Skincare illustrations for yDesign

by Ryan Moore


I had the opportunity to create these forms to spec for yDesign this week.

The image below is a blend of Illustrator and Photoshop.

The deliverable was a cleanly-layered Illustrator file, with a focus on realistic illustrations that the client could easily edit themselves for color, size, layout, and graphics. 

Apothecary forms for yDesign.